Week 8: Emerging Powers- India in Africa

Jessica Slade- 110232060

For the purposes of this week’s blog post, I will be responding to the readings of Ian Taylor in “India’s Rise in Africa,” Renu Modi’s, “Offshore Healthcare Management: Medical Tourism between Kenya, Tanzania and India,” and lastly Luke Patey’s, “Fragile Fortunes: India’s Oil Venture into War-torn Sudan”. Over the last two weeks we have assessed the place of China and USA in Africa, and we further the discussion this week with the addition of India in Africa. Before diving into the required readings, it is interesting to view this image:

In this image we can see the size of economic invested, as presented by data from some of the largest countries involved. Note the place of USA, China and India in Africa.

In this image we can see the size of economic investment, as presented by data from some of the largest countries involved. Note the place of USA, China and India in Africa.

Ian Taylor wrote the work “India’s Rise in Africa,” where we learn about the emerging and growing relationship between India within the whole of Africa. Taylor puts specific emphasis on the place of policy within the context of historical analysis to show just how relations have grown and changed over time. This is important to note as it helps to explain the shifting partnerships, business endeavours, as well as various political power structures. Last week we studied how China does business in Africa, assessing the place of nation-to-nation development strategies, where as here we are seeing the emergence of commercially driven private investment strategies. In seeing this scale of investment and trade, the image mentioned above sheds light on the size of this partnership. What is important to note about India however, is the shift from a country that relied heavily on foreign aid, to one of the largest growing aid donors of the 21st century. In reading this work were you aware of the global order that is presented in terms of who and what are the driving forces of economic investment in Africa? Were you surprised that India was on the list, with a different strategy than China? How do the two compare, and in your opinion what relationship has the potential for longevity?

The second work this week was written by Renu Modi’s, entitled “Offshore Healthcare Management: Medical Tourism between Kenya, Tanzania and India”. In this work we are exposed to a different form of investment, one that is based in a form of medical ‘tourism’, rooted in heath care management. Modi speaks to the growing wave of people who travel from Kenya and Tanzania in search of healthcare. These people make their way to India in hoped of receiving a better standard of health care than what can be found in their own countries. In this work we learn of methods used to obtain peoples, such as advertising campaigns and other problematic strategies that boast the Indian healthcare system. Modi’s work raises much attention to an often-unknown trend that is emerging in Africa. Prior to reading this work were you aware of medical tourism? How does this compare to other forms of tourism such as eco-tourism or volun-tourism? What would you conclude the long-term effects of this process would be-consider both the African states affected and the Indian healthcare system as a whole? Is this action warranted as a self-less action, or do you think that the Indo-African relations are created with a sense of hidden agenda?

The last article entitled “Fragile Fortunes: India’s Oil Venture into War-torn Sudan” written by Luke Patey. In this reading we learn about yet another form of Indian investment in Africa. Rather than being health care based, this investment is rooted in the acquisition of oil in Sudan. In this work we learn of the historical shift of investments in Sudan over the recent years. We learn that India’s investment decisions came after the exit of many western groups and that the completion for oil was in many ways directly against Chinese investments. Patey explains the correlation between oil and conflicts in Sudan and how the human rights based violations are affecting both the people of Sudan and the OVL. After reading this work and learning more background on the oil-based conflict in Sudan, do you believe that India did the right thing by seeing the opportunity to invest and doing so after the exit of western investors- or should they have followed the trend and not gotten involved in Sudan? As one of the biggest oil investors in Sudan do you think India has a responsibility to ensure its investments are not indirectly affecting the stability of local peoples? What should be done to ensure human-rights violations are addressed promptly?

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